Blog    Recent Publications

“At Sea with the Marine Birds of the Raincoast”, by Dr. Caroline Fox

Dr. Caroline Fox, BMSC Fall Program instructor, has written a new book entitled: “At Sea with the Marine Birds of the Raincoast”, to be released early May.

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Morphological trade-off between drag avoidance and tolerance in wave-swept kelps.

Kelps from wave-swept shores have either a streamlined morphology to reduce drag, or increased attachment and breakage force, but not both, having implications for the evolution of morphological diversity in this group.

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A new book on the evolution of ‘animal athletes’, by Irschick & Higham

This book by Duncan Irschick and BMSC instructor Tim HIgham examines how and why ‘animal athletes’ have evolved using examples from across the animal kingdom, integrating them into the broader context of ecology and evolution.

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Coastal Field Archaeology 2013 student course work published

Undergraduate student course work, examining ancient First Nations mariculture activies on BC’s coast, was recently published in the journal American Antiquites. The research was conducted during the 2013 Coastal Field Archaeology course.

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‘Waxopods’ provide a reliable estimate of crab predation intensity

Gastropod wax replicas can be used to quantify the frequency and type of attacks by crab predators, which likely play a vital role in structuring gastropod populations.

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How many chromosomes contribute to sex determination in a copepod?

QTL mapping of sex ratio phenotype revealed six independently segregating quantitative trait loci on five separate chromosomes, explaining 19% of the variation in sex ratios in Tigriopus californicus.

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Hagfish slime reduces uptake of metals, but not organic nutrients.

Hagfish slime acts as a selective filter, allowing the passage of nutrients across the skin, but impairing the transport of trace elements that may cause toxicity at relatively elevated levels.

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Physiological responses of intertidal starfish when exposed at low tide

Physiological mechanisms of Pisaster ochraceus suggest this species is ideally suited for life in the intertidal zone.

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Where are the biggest mussels?

Connor and Robles (2015), working on small a spatial scale, show that mussels (Mytilus californicus) from low-shore and high wave exposure habitats grow faster when young and become the largest adults.

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How gooseneck barnacles mate despite having ‘unusually short’ penises.

Gooseneck barnacles (Pollicipes polymerus) have evolved novel mating strategies in the wave-swept intertidal.

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